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The Odd Woman and the City

Sophie Calle

 

“Calle is a character in her own story, a false witness, an unreliable narrator. Feigning a hysterical kind of love coded female, with an analytical bent. With a sly humour, power relations are flipped and flipped again. Who is in control, who is the butt of the work? In the case of The Address Book, the victim, in response to having his friends’ opinion of his private life splashed across the pages of Libération, attempted to get his revenge on Calle by having the newspaper publish nude photos of her. Of that work, she said: ‘The sense of excitement was much stronger than the guilt’.

In Double Game, Calle allows novelist Paul Auster to fictionalize her life in a novel, before republishing his account with her own red corrections scrawled on top. Taking it one step further, she then requests that the author give her tasks to do, as though she is a character in one of his novels, and the interaction culminates in a project entitled Gotham Handbook.

Other works play out this repeated doubling-back, such as The Detective, where she asked her mother to hire a private detective to follow her, while she had someone follow the detective, engaging in a game of triangulation and elusiveness, the trick of being the woman who evades, always disappearing round a corner. An object that first receives the world before finding pattern in the day, letting things circle back around, playing out the real work of looking. This mode requires a certain shiftlessness, one not traditionally accorded to women, who rarely know what it feels like to be anonymous, to pass through space unnoticed.”

Read Madeileine Stack’s full piece here.

Photography by Sophie Calle.

eve wears read, rebound

New York based artists Elliot Camarra and Guy Kozak recently finished a new short film ‘In This My Life,’ which is a sequel to their previous collaboration ‘Eve Wears Red, Rebound’.

This is an excerpt from the conversation LYRA had with Elliot and Guy:

Is our culture too much or too little obsessed with the past?
Elliot: From my experience of our culture, people seem to be more obsessed with the future than the past right now. Whether or not that’s true, there’s always a kind of magic when you find yourself to be the receiver of a set of clues to somebody else’s story.

What themes do you explore through your art and why do you use film as a medium?
Elliot: We both are interested in gender in a way that makes our work parallel. My paintings and sculptural work often consider femininity and Guy’s movies often deal with masculinity. We both approach our ideas through a kind of domestic surrealism. Guy: Film is a naturally collaborative medium. In the preparation and shooting, we’ve found that it works well as a vehicle for combining our individual aesthetics and interests. In the editing phase, where the projects really start to take shape, we assemble the footage with a joint painterly intuition that turns it into something neither of us could have anticipated.

Read the full interview with Elliot Camarra and Guy Kozak here.

 

 

Arianna Lago

  126331189488              screen-shot-2016-10-15-at-17-23-41              www-ariannalago-com

Initially, Arianna Lago trained as a composer and sound artist – look at those vibrant notes in her use of colour.

Arianna Lago is an Italian photographer based in London. Mainly using 35mm her work lets transpire emotions, effortless fragility, and a painterly organic feel. She’s both attracted by the beautiful and the odd and her aim in photography is to find a way to bring those elements together in one image. Fundamental parts of her visual lexicon are also the use of rich colour palettes, elements of surreal and nostalgia in the everyday.

See her full photo essay for LYRA’s second issue here.

Apathetic Journal

LYRA Speaks to Apathetic Journal

Apathetic Journal describes itself as ‘a thematic, biannual arts and design exhibition and publication, aimed at disproving the fallacy that youth is characterised by apathy.’ It was cofounded in Australia by Anador Walsh and Morgan Brennan, in 2015, and it’s first two issues focussed solely on Australian creatives, though its third issue, to be themed Log Off, will branch out internationally. I chatted, over email, to Anador about the Australian scene and the future of print media.

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Philippa Snow talks to artist Lauren Cohen

We have invited LYRA’s issue 1 contributors to interview, write or do just about anything for our blog. Philippa Snow chose to have a conversation with the artist Lauren Cohen. Philippa wrote about Showgirls for issue 1.

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Jimmy Dabbagh – Transparent

Jimmy Dabbagh is, in his own words, a third generation kid: someone from many places. A true modern. His photographs of Lebanon appear in LYRA’s first issue, here he talks to us about identity and his upcoming project, Transparent which he describes as a ‘collaborative project with members from the Lebanese LGBTQ community’.

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Sappho

Jessica Worden on Sappho

We were casting around for a classic (a Linda Snell-esque word) poet to use in our first issue. It’s always difficult, though – the past. After deliberation, we chose Sappho: the foremost erotic poet of antiquity (imagine how Ovid’d shudder if her work was more than fragment!) We asked Jessica Worden to write about her for us, and she delivered more than the scholarly summing up we’d half-expected and not, really, wanted. Her essay begins

I think of Sappho by the sea. She sings against the noise of the wind and waves crashing, standing on the sand of Lesbos. She knew many forms of love.

And ends

She acknowledges the bitterness of absence in this fragment but pairs it with the perpetuation of desire through the corporeal traces within memory. I think of Sappho by the sea. She sings against the noise of the wind and waves crashing, standing on the sand of Lesbos. She knew many forms of love.

Jessica’s is a beautiful piece, gently lyrical, humble even. She does not force the poet into this or that corner, does not decide what Sappho meant, but shows her to the reader in the palm on her hand: a flower, a weed, a gorgeous blade of grass. By the sea.

– Jago Rackham

Read Jessica’s full article in issue 1: subscribe and support our Kickstarter here.

Bezo Uznadze - photography

The Photography of Beso Uznadze

Issue 1 features the work of the London based Georgian photographer Beso Uznadze. LYRA’s editor Jago asked him some questions about the role of identity and nudity in his photography.

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Ailsa Ogden Feminism

Nikki van der Gaag on Feminism & Men

In our first issue, the feminist campaigner Nikki van der Gaag argues that men, boys especially, must be inducted into feminism if the movements success is to be ensured because

boys who witness their fathers using violence against their mothers are more likely to use violence against their partners when they grow up. At the other end of the spectrum, boys who see their fathers sharing the housework, looking after the children and being respectful towards women are likely to replicate this positive behaviour when they become adults.

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Fighting Bricklayer - Masculinity

David James Fox On Aggressive Masculinity

Earlier this week, the artist Grayson Perry attacked Bear Grylls’ (that name!) for promoting a ‘useless’ brand of masculinity that’s ‘a hangover from a more violent age’. He argued that the sort of thing Bear (!) gets up to, hunting, killing, climbing et al, are useless in our modern age – well, obviously.

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