Posts

Arianna Lago

  126331189488              screen-shot-2016-10-15-at-17-23-41              www-ariannalago-com

Initially, Arianna Lago trained as a composer and sound artist – look at those vibrant notes in her use of colour.

Arianna Lago is an Italian photographer based in London. Mainly using 35mm her work lets transpire emotions, effortless fragility, and a painterly organic feel. She’s both attracted by the beautiful and the odd and her aim in photography is to find a way to bring those elements together in one image. Fundamental parts of her visual lexicon are also the use of rich colour palettes, elements of surreal and nostalgia in the everyday.

See her full photo essay for LYRA’s second issue here.

Iliana Kanellopoulou’s Violent Women

Young Greek photographer Iliana Kanellopoulou says ‘guns are for women too.’ Against the backdrop of the anti-austerity protests in Athens, influenced by images of female Kurdish fighters, Iliana wants to photograph a ‘fictional feminist army’. She’s teaming up with other female photographers to create a photo-pamphlet filled with different visions of what this might look like.

 

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LittleBird_Kickstarter_13 crowd fund

Little Bird: A Film about Women Shot by Women

LYRA, obviously, knows how useful, and liberating, it can be to crowd fund. So we’re very interested in other creative ventures that choose this path, especially if they’ve similar interests to us. We heard about the efforts of Georgia Oakley to raise funds for a short film about women shot by a completely female team, and asked Georgia to write something about the film, and her decision to rely on the crowd.

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Jocelyn Allen, photographs from two projects

Jocelyn’s Allen’s self-portraiture explores, with poise, the blurred borders between self-exposure, exploration and protection. We present photos from two of her recent collections, Covering the Carpet (2014) and Amalgamated Anomalies (2014-15).  Read more

Kickstarter Video – LYRA

Though we completed our Kickstarter campaign (thank you everyone!) we feel our video presents the ideas behind LYRA so beautifully that it should be available on our blog! You can buy the first issue of LYRA here.

Our memory of shooting the video is a mixed one. On the one hand, we exceptionally lucky to work with the amazing Giorgio Bosisioon the other hand we completely melted on camera, and had to be coaxed back into making sense. By the end of our twelve hour day, in which we also filmed Irma Kurtz, we could barely speak, and were both utterly sick of, well, everything. We will never forget the hilarity of Giorgio making Jago repeat a middle-length sentence twenty or so times.

Philippa Snow talks to artist Lauren Cohen

We have invited LYRA’s issue 1 contributors to interview, write or do just about anything for our blog. Philippa Snow chose to have a conversation with the artist Lauren Cohen. Philippa wrote about Showgirls for issue 1.

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LYRA’s Sunny Walkabout

It was so sunny yesterday that we decided to take LYRA on a walk around Camden. We went to a coffee shop and read under the sunbeams, chatting with locals about the beautiful afternoon and, of course, LYRA. Everyone wanted to touch it, and were drawn to its beautiful design, relevant topics and, perhaps, the nostalgia they felt toward print magazines.

We finished our stroll at the news stand, really touched by the warm welcome Londoners had given us. It was a beautiful afternoon indeed.

Subscribe to the magazine, support our Kickstarter & buy tickets to our launch party here.

Text and photos by Luisa Fernanda.

 

Orgasm

Clare Lydon on the Orgasm Now

In the first of our series on how much has changed since the ground-breaking feminist magazine Spare Rib’s 1970s heyday, we look at the female orgasm and ask: is the orgasm still a feminist issue? Discussing this, Clare Lydon quotes a ’70s doctor saying

“The toughest problem to treat is frigidity, some say because a woman’s response is so subjective, varied and vulnerable to so many outside factors. In any case, success depends upon the goals of the patient. Some are happy to be having sex at all. Some want the moon.” 

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Jimmy Dabbagh – Transparent

Jimmy Dabbagh is, in his own words, a third generation kid: someone from many places. A true modern. His photographs of Lebanon appear in LYRA’s first issue, here he talks to us about identity and his upcoming project, Transparent which he describes as a ‘collaborative project with members from the Lebanese LGBTQ community’.

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Sappho

Jessica Worden on Sappho

We were casting around for a classic (a Linda Snell-esque word) poet to use in our first issue. It’s always difficult, though – the past. After deliberation, we chose Sappho: the foremost erotic poet of antiquity (imagine how Ovid’d shudder if her work was more than fragment!) We asked Jessica Worden to write about her for us, and she delivered more than the scholarly summing up we’d half-expected and not, really, wanted. Her essay begins

I think of Sappho by the sea. She sings against the noise of the wind and waves crashing, standing on the sand of Lesbos. She knew many forms of love.

And ends

She acknowledges the bitterness of absence in this fragment but pairs it with the perpetuation of desire through the corporeal traces within memory. I think of Sappho by the sea. She sings against the noise of the wind and waves crashing, standing on the sand of Lesbos. She knew many forms of love.

Jessica’s is a beautiful piece, gently lyrical, humble even. She does not force the poet into this or that corner, does not decide what Sappho meant, but shows her to the reader in the palm on her hand: a flower, a weed, a gorgeous blade of grass. By the sea.

– Jago Rackham

Read Jessica’s full article in issue 1: subscribe and support our Kickstarter here.