Posts

Iliana Kanellopoulou’s Violent Women

Young Greek photographer Iliana Kanellopoulou says ‘guns are for women too.’ Against the backdrop of the anti-austerity protests in Athens, influenced by images of female Kurdish fighters, Iliana wants to photograph a ‘fictional feminist army’. She’s teaming up with other female photographers to create a photo-pamphlet filled with different visions of what this might look like.

 

Read more

Sappho

Jessica Worden on Sappho

We were casting around for a classic (a Linda Snell-esque word) poet to use in our first issue. It’s always difficult, though – the past. After deliberation, we chose Sappho: the foremost erotic poet of antiquity (imagine how Ovid’d shudder if her work was more than fragment!) We asked Jessica Worden to write about her for us, and she delivered more than the scholarly summing up we’d half-expected and not, really, wanted. Her essay begins

I think of Sappho by the sea. She sings against the noise of the wind and waves crashing, standing on the sand of Lesbos. She knew many forms of love.

And ends

She acknowledges the bitterness of absence in this fragment but pairs it with the perpetuation of desire through the corporeal traces within memory. I think of Sappho by the sea. She sings against the noise of the wind and waves crashing, standing on the sand of Lesbos. She knew many forms of love.

Jessica’s is a beautiful piece, gently lyrical, humble even. She does not force the poet into this or that corner, does not decide what Sappho meant, but shows her to the reader in the palm on her hand: a flower, a weed, a gorgeous blade of grass. By the sea.

– Jago Rackham

Read Jessica’s full article in issue 1: subscribe and support our Kickstarter here.

What Lyra means, no 2 – the lyre

The lyre accompanied Greek poets (for instance, Sappho’s who we celebrate in our first issue) in the Ancient world. Like the garish (and frankly tasteless) manner in which Greek marbles, like the Parthenon sculptures, were painted, this shows that the Greeks were far from staid. No near silent poetry readings, interrupted by mute coughs, but cocophanies of music and expression. I’ve always thought Greek must have been an odd, guttural language; and the earliest written record of the lyre, its name in Mycean Greek: ru-ra-ta-e. The wonderful Ensemble Kérylos, which attempts to play Greek music as the Greeks played it, seems to bare this thought through: it is beautiful, but rough – unrefined.

Read more