Posts

Jocelyn Allen, photographs from two projects

Jocelyn’s Allen’s self-portraiture explores, with poise, the blurred borders between self-exposure, exploration and protection. We present photos from two of her recent collections, Covering the Carpet (2014) and Amalgamated Anomalies (2014-15).  Read more

Apathetic Journal

LYRA Speaks to Apathetic Journal

Apathetic Journal describes itself as ‘a thematic, biannual arts and design exhibition and publication, aimed at disproving the fallacy that youth is characterised by apathy.’ It was cofounded in Australia by Anador Walsh and Morgan Brennan, in 2015, and it’s first two issues focussed solely on Australian creatives, though its third issue, to be themed Log Off, will branch out internationally. I chatted, over email, to Anador about the Australian scene and the future of print media.

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Philippa Snow talks to artist Lauren Cohen

We have invited LYRA’s issue 1 contributors to interview, write or do just about anything for our blog. Philippa Snow chose to have a conversation with the artist Lauren Cohen. Philippa wrote about Showgirls for issue 1.

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Jimmy Dabbagh – Transparent

Jimmy Dabbagh is, in his own words, a third generation kid: someone from many places. A true modern. His photographs of Lebanon appear in LYRA’s first issue, here he talks to us about identity and his upcoming project, Transparent which he describes as a ‘collaborative project with members from the Lebanese LGBTQ community’.

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Ailsa Ogden Feminism

Nikki van der Gaag on Feminism & Men

In our first issue, the feminist campaigner Nikki van der Gaag argues that men, boys especially, must be inducted into feminism if the movements success is to be ensured because

boys who witness their fathers using violence against their mothers are more likely to use violence against their partners when they grow up. At the other end of the spectrum, boys who see their fathers sharing the housework, looking after the children and being respectful towards women are likely to replicate this positive behaviour when they become adults.

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Woman's Emporium

Sh! Woman’s Emporium

I used to live across the street from Sh! Woman’s Emporium in Hoxton, but I didn’t go in until I interviewed their founder, Ky.

I’m not sure why: partly, until recently, men needed to be accompanied by a woman. And it was too close. I don’t like having to say hello to someone every morning (a problem I had with Goodhood) because, often, I am in no mood to do so. And, I always figured, if I needed to buy something from them I’d rather the experience be somewhat alien finding the erotic, generally, to reside in the unknown. After a few weeks, it simply ceased to really exist for me. It was just another shop I walked past, like Goodhood or, latterly, Prohibition Vapes.

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Fighting Bricklayer - Masculinity

David James Fox On Aggressive Masculinity

Earlier this week, the artist Grayson Perry attacked Bear Grylls’ (that name!) for promoting a ‘useless’ brand of masculinity that’s ‘a hangover from a more violent age’. He argued that the sort of thing Bear (!) gets up to, hunting, killing, climbing et al, are useless in our modern age – well, obviously.

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Roots Frida Kahlo - Hair

Luisa Fernanda on hair shaming

My London friends had no idea that my natural hair is curly and unruly.

My natural hair is curly, undisciplined and frizzy. I have straightened it since I was very young. I liked it more: it was silky, sophisticated and, somehow, people reacted differently to it. I was definitely a fan of my straighteners.

My mum was a straight hair advocate, and I followed her steps. We used to spend hours and lots of money at the hairdresser’s. I never questioned our moth-daughter tradition of despising all hairstyles that were not straight and silky. When I came to London I realised that African hair, braids and corns where considered ‘unprofessional’.

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Spencer Tunick – Sea of Hull

Our first issue will feature new work by Spencer Tunick alongside an interview with Sivan Lavie, in which he offered an interesting insight into the changing relationship between nudity and sexuality in his work

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