Posts

Arianna Lago

  126331189488              screen-shot-2016-10-15-at-17-23-41              www-ariannalago-com

Initially, Arianna Lago trained as a composer and sound artist – look at those vibrant notes in her use of colour.

Arianna Lago is an Italian photographer based in London. Mainly using 35mm her work lets transpire emotions, effortless fragility, and a painterly organic feel. She’s both attracted by the beautiful and the odd and her aim in photography is to find a way to bring those elements together in one image. Fundamental parts of her visual lexicon are also the use of rich colour palettes, elements of surreal and nostalgia in the everyday.

See her full photo essay for LYRA’s second issue here.

Apathetic Journal

LYRA Speaks to Apathetic Journal

Apathetic Journal describes itself as ‘a thematic, biannual arts and design exhibition and publication, aimed at disproving the fallacy that youth is characterised by apathy.’ It was cofounded in Australia by Anador Walsh and Morgan Brennan, in 2015, and it’s first two issues focussed solely on Australian creatives, though its third issue, to be themed Log Off, will branch out internationally. I chatted, over email, to Anador about the Australian scene and the future of print media.

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Philippa Snow talks to artist Lauren Cohen

We have invited LYRA’s issue 1 contributors to interview, write or do just about anything for our blog. Philippa Snow chose to have a conversation with the artist Lauren Cohen. Philippa wrote about Showgirls for issue 1.

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LYRA’s Sunny Walkabout

It was so sunny yesterday that we decided to take LYRA on a walk around Camden. We went to a coffee shop and read under the sunbeams, chatting with locals about the beautiful afternoon and, of course, LYRA. Everyone wanted to touch it, and were drawn to its beautiful design, relevant topics and, perhaps, the nostalgia they felt toward print magazines.

We finished our stroll at the news stand, really touched by the warm welcome Londoners had given us. It was a beautiful afternoon indeed.

Subscribe to the magazine, support our Kickstarter & buy tickets to our launch party here.

Text and photos by Luisa Fernanda.

 

Jimmy Dabbagh – Transparent

Jimmy Dabbagh is, in his own words, a third generation kid: someone from many places. A true modern. His photographs of Lebanon appear in LYRA’s first issue, here he talks to us about identity and his upcoming project, Transparent which he describes as a ‘collaborative project with members from the Lebanese LGBTQ community’.

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Ailsa Ogden Feminism

Nikki van der Gaag on Feminism & Men

In our first issue, the feminist campaigner Nikki van der Gaag argues that men, boys especially, must be inducted into feminism if the movements success is to be ensured because

boys who witness their fathers using violence against their mothers are more likely to use violence against their partners when they grow up. At the other end of the spectrum, boys who see their fathers sharing the housework, looking after the children and being respectful towards women are likely to replicate this positive behaviour when they become adults.

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Condom Over Knife - Sasha Kurmaz - 2010 = Homonormativity

Richard McDonald on Homonormativity

In our first issue Richard McDonald asserts, simply, that

The ‘good life’ is a capitalist one.

From this position, he examines what happens when gay men are inducted into this good life through victories (marriage equality) and greater acceptance:

Gay (white, cis) men are now protected as members of the productive economy, able to buy into the dynamic of cruel optimism that lives in the image of the nuclear family: the stable job, the high wage, the relationship founded on marriage, the children born in wedlock, and so forth. This signals a momentous shift away from the radical rethinkings of kinship once so dear to gay men. As capitalism offers us a tool with which to carve out a space for ourselves in mainstream society, it tempts us to leave behind the radical aspects of gayness and queerness that it finds distasteful. When the dust settles, and your space is carved out, the template of sexual identity you have left is a very strict one. It represents a new wave of homosexual normality: the ‘homonormative’ template.

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Fighting Bricklayer - Masculinity

David James Fox On Aggressive Masculinity

Earlier this week, the artist Grayson Perry attacked Bear Grylls’ (that name!) for promoting a ‘useless’ brand of masculinity that’s ‘a hangover from a more violent age’. He argued that the sort of thing Bear (!) gets up to, hunting, killing, climbing et al, are useless in our modern age – well, obviously.

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